Motivational Advice from an Elite Runner

Happy Saturday, friends! I was up bright and early this morning after getting in some good shut-eye last night, and headed out for an easy 5 miler. Since it was 50 degrees even at 7:30am, I wore a short sleeve and running tights. The first mile was chilly with a light breeze, but I soon warmed up- I always prefer under dressing a bit than overdressing, as I can’t stand being hot while running! It was a beautiful morning to be outside!

380Early morning in Moab, Utah- very peaceful, much like Boston is in the early morning! 

On another note, I wanted to share with you some feedback I received from an elite runner Charlotte Browning, a UK-born elite runner. Her advice is regarding dealing with a loss of motivation following a setback in your running career. Her words can be applied to many situations, whether you’re dealing with a poor goal race performance, a failed training run, or dealing with an injury- most runners can relate to setbacks at some point in your running career. Bottom line: dream big and challenges are to be expected. But that should not stop you from continuing to follow your dreams.

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A little background: Charlotte started running at a young age, later ran for the University of Florida which lead to two NCAA championships in the mile and 1500m. According to her bio, Charlotte went on to finish 4th at the U23 European cross country championships, and after college she represented New Balance for 2 years. She now runs for the shoe brand Hoka ONE ONE. Charlotte is currently aiming to hit the Olympic A standard for the 2016 Rio Olympics in the 5k.

 I had written to Charlotte at a time when my motivation to meet my new running goals was dipping a bit.

In response, she wrote:

“Setbacks are tough and relative for every runner. Anyone who has set a goal and is working towards it in any walk of life will find adversity difficult to come back from. Setting a new goal is great and that means you are well on your way, but every runner will go through a stage where they lack motivation or compare their fitness to where it was and be hard on themselves. Just keep going through the process of daily training and take one day at a time and you will be rewarded. Sometimes just getting out the door (especially in the colder months) is tough but once you’re out there you feel better. 
If you can meet up with running friends or other runners in the community then that usually helps a lot with motivation.

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I truly appreciate Charlotte’s perspective on motivation and dealing with setbacks. She too has overcome some in her running career, but came away from these much stronger and ready to run the Olympic Trials! I will be thinking of her advice when I run my half tomorrow, and in all my upcoming runs.

What are some “motivational tips” of your own?

Have a wonderful Saturday readers!

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14 thoughts on “Motivational Advice from an Elite Runner”

  1. You have nicer weather than us here in ABQ. We are on the edge of some snow.

    Excellent advice to take things “one day at a time”….wonder where I’ve heard that before heh.

    Utah looks beautiful and enjoy your half. Though I very much doubt Boston peaceful is anything like Utah peaceful. There is something different out here in the West. It just…..is.

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    1. Thanks for your message! I agree with the peaceful environment out west– it is a different vibe out there and I love it. I have been surprised how quiet & peaceful Boston can be during early morning runs. A lower bar than out where you are, but surprisingly awesome! Have you run a marathon in ABQ?

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      1. You know I have not officially run a marathon ever. I’ve done a number of halfs, and a few ultras and during training I’ve run several marathon distances, but never an official marathon.

        Duke City Marathon is in October every year but I have opted to run the Deadman Peaks Ultra so far. Perhaps this is the year?

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